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practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
in five years. >> susie: so is the slow growth environment coming to an end, or is the u.s. economy still stuck in neutral? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: ann lenane has sold real estate in up and down markets, what she says about today's market might surprise you. >> the real estate market is hot. it is on fire. >> reporter: her read on real estate market makes sense given that home sales and new construction are recovering from their recent steep declines. and, some economists believe housing will replace manufacturing as a key growth driver this year. beyond the housing, the economy has recently been showing other signs of strength. retail sales and manufacturing activity were surprisingly strong in december. today, we learned that jobless claims are at a five-year low. on top of that the stock market, often considered a leading indicator of the economy hit a five-year high today. we're not talking about any old high, it's the highest level for the s&p 500 since before the financial crisis. still, not all economists believe there's reason to celebrate, just yet. >> we've been loo
combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor
i know in the corporate environment, if you -- motivational speakers, even yesterday i was listening to an alternative high school and their core values really -- of inquiry, and exploration, and all that sort of stuff really embodied how they taught their students and their students performed and achieved. so these words do mean something. and so i do think it's important to have them and to make them present, because if you have them present, then you can point to them when you're not living up to them. but, you know, probably, yeah, it could -- could more work be done, we administer words or tack away more words i'm sure we could. the value is in the exercise and rallying around the things that matter. and if we probably have a much more fruitful conversation looking at some of the bullet points under the values that we've outlined and adding to those, and then maybe separate in another conversation, talk about, you know, tactics, which is around proposition "m" or whatever. and that's probably part of a larger general plan discussion which i think we're going to get to when we ta
also had donald olivier from the department of environment come and talk a little bit about his organization's interest and some of the work they've done currently with the puc on helping with outreach. so, that is -- that was something that we did that was great. and the minutes, the draft minutes you have, it's also on the website. as far as our membership, we are currently at 15 of 17 members seated, and i would love to thank supervisor kim for her recent appointment of nella manuel who is our 15th member. we have two vacant seats currently. if anyone knows anyone who would like to be on the citizens advisory committee in supervisor farrell's district, please send them his way. also, we need a large water user that mayor lee appoints. i'll be putting together a report the past year, what we did forward looking and what we'll be working on in 2013. and if anyone has anything that they would like to see us give input that would be helpful for the commission, i'd loch to know that either now or any kind of correspondence. * love to know that thank you. >> thank you for your ser
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
to pass comprehensive legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those h
to you? u.s. energy independence or the u.s. environment? do you ever have enough "money"? ♪ adam: thousands of ew york city udents were left out in the cold when school bus drivers and aides went on strike in an effort to cut cost. the city has put its contracts to private bus companies up for bid. a move that put union jobs at risk. joining us to this crest to have discussed this but director of labor notes. why would putting the contract out to bid be a problem of the members of the union. >> they have ben for very long time. this time around the administration wants to do so without service standards. adam: to protect long time bus tours, does it not? >> it establishes a seniority system were if your route -- intercompany that you work for loses the route you conveyed into other companies. >> if your route is cut and there are is restored, the have a different route, they did brought in based on seniority which mea you are higher paid employees and someone. >> so it rewards stability and longevity and keeps a much more stable work force the more you would have otherwise? adam:
of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of
being eased up, a very good environment for lending, very solid for housing. i can see a lot more reasons to be positive than negative right now. >> if interest rates went up 100 basis points, you think housing would do as well? >> you think they will go up 100 basis points. >> my point is housing better do good at historically manipulated low rates. i don't see that it's bragging rights here. >> right, right. the minute interest rates going up, where is the blockbuster in housing building taking place, in the midwest or takingce in new york city, new york, the tri-metro area, boston, chicago, where is it taking place because housing in and around the new york metro area is not going off to the races? >> well, you're going to see it across the country. that seems to be what the surveys are showing. now, the latest survey of the national association of home builders suggested things were a little bit flat, but you're going to get rebuilding after hurricane sandy in the northeast, and there are bidding wars in places like phoenix and parts of florida that used to be soaking in exces
to difficult unlearn, toe to speak. >> in this regulatory environment, they have got, to rick. >> i agree, but i think it's going to be nasty every first friday of the month for a while longer. >> all right. >> certainly going to be a lot of volatility. >> thanks, guys. see you later, gentlemen. >> michael fax he's bilingual, no knew. >> try having to say bartiromo every day. a big pair of bank earnings. a preview of american, press and intel. >> let's start win tell, folks. 45 cents, looking $13.5 billion in revenue. that's not what is important. intel couldn't trade on last quarter's numbers. it trades on forward revenue guide as. that's where the problem might be, so they are looking for 14.5 billion in the fourth quarter. the question is what's the guidance going to be, and a lot of people are concerned it's going to be below the current quarter numbers so 12.5 to 13.5 billion a lot of people are looking at. at 12.5 billion or below there's a problem for intel. american express, unfortunately, not a lot of sussense. i think it was the 10th last week when they were standing here. pre-a
political environment, what is the number one challenge as he prepares to address the american people tomorrow? >> well, i still think it is about the hope of the american people, and it is still historic, the second inauguration of this president. but at the same time, obviously, it's going to be working with congress to get the economy moving, moving forward in terms of the big initiatives that the president considers to be so important with regard to immigration reform, implementation of health care reform and making sure that everybody has an opportunity, has a shot at the american dream. >> you mentioned health care reform. you know, republicans would say he did that first last time. he got in our face. that ruined the environment. i know each side blames the other side. i don't want to revisit history, but as the president picks his order this time, republicans have, for example, shown a willingness to work on immigration. should he do immigration before gun control, try to cooperate before confrontation? >> well, i think the president is going to move forward and see this as a
been studying how the radiation from fukushima has affected the environment. maybe you can give a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very s
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety business and thanks to all of his decades of experience on capitol hill, he and i worked with congress to have included in map 21 the ability of the fta to have responsibility for transit safety. we were outlawed from doing it, and now we will have the authority to do it. this is a real breakthrough. and it really fits her safety agend
that if they really want to create value and send their stocks higher, the best way to do that in this environment may be simply to buy another company. hence, the huge spike in m and a activity in the fourth quarter. i think it's big. this trend continues in 2013, if you ask me. but i don't want just to see more deals. i want them to be the right deals. buy, buy, buy. so for all of the lonely is ceos who i'm sure are sitting on the rooftops singing. ♪ matchmaker make me a match ♪ find me a match make me a perfect match so you can sing, yes i am a rich man to a very plaintive tune. the hottest theme out there, a steaming hot thing, housing. these two combined, business will be an absolute powerhouse. i'm talking about masco and fortune brands home and security. two makers of cabinets, plumbing fixtures and other housing-related products. masco is the largest non commodity supplier to home depot and i should point out that any deal to acquire fortune brands would have to be done later in the year because of arcane tax laws. that's the caveat. still, the timing. we are now witnessing a fabulous hous
of capacity and given the macro environment, given the cannibalization that tablets are doing with the expensive notebooks and the road map that is questionable. >> is there a road map that you see that gets them into the tablet and mobile space in a better way? you look at what is happening to the stock of arm, look at the stock of qualcomm, and these guys are nowhere in the same arena. >> that's a good question. they have the road map to get in. will they have a position of dominance? being the same is not going to be enough, particularly given a lot of oems over many, many years being accustom to them being basically sole source or a dominant proprietary source when you have an alternative where you have a multi source solution, some suppliers that use their processing from a company called arm. so it's going to be very tough. you have to have significant advances for oems to use your product. i don't think they that. >> what does this say about hue yet pack yard? what does this say about the news about dell with a potential buyout? i assume what is happening at intel is ha
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
.s. environment? do you ever have enough "money"? what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... thithing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announc ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announc ] save on ground shipping we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ adam: thousands of new york city students were left out in the cold when school bus drivers and aides went on strike in an effort to cut cost. the city has put its contracts to private bus companies up for bid. a move that puts union jobs at risk. joining us to this crest to have discussed this but director of labor notes. why would putting the contract out to bid be a problem of the members of the union. >> they have been for very long time.
of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we need to update the antiquated computer system. one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have a kind of the system will break down, it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> there's another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending around. some of that might be true. the bigger issue is nilements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat. it's the one that is
. >> all right. how do you want to allocate capital then, bruce? how are you investing in this environment? >> we think it's important not to be taking too little risk, so certainly making sure that you have adequate exposure, especially to things like the emerging markets where the fundamentals of growth are a lot better than they are in the united states is clearly important, but most of all making sure that you're taking in risk in line with what you can afford to take and not taking too much and not too little but really controlling it throughout the year. >> steve. is it possible that the beige report that we get today is sort of ancient history because things are becoming clearer now as far as the fiscal policy of the united states. we still have the debt crisis coming in a couple of months here to be resolved, but, you know, things do seem to be getting better. we've had some companies say that the housing market is for real right now, for example. >> yeah. i guess there's two different ways to think about it, bill. ancient history or crystal ball telling our future. i mean, when i
that meander we do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
of transportation, explosive devices take place, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the hot zone. you
's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region who actively participate in the silicon valley internet crimes against children task force. the investigation resulted in the arrest of four predators who possessed hundreds of images. as you can see we have many moving parts under the svu model, and it is important to recognize the specialist team appointed to investigate crimes in human traff
because of the environment offered. the first thing interurban competitiveness for community competitiveness is where do people want to be and he's moving cities. every city i work in, they want to attract engines of lunch premiership. 64% in favor they want to live, then they moved their look for a job. 77% say they want to live in america's urban cores. why? and massive cultural shift. when i was young, one out of 1219-year-olds opted out of getting their drivers license. now it's one out of four. the tv shows, chris weinberger asked me, what tv shows teach you watch growing up as an approaching 50? i watch rady bunch, partridge family, gilligan's island, all suburban tv shows. there is hawaii five o come was hawaii 50, streets of san francisco, crime television shows in the city. and of course there was lucille ball and the honeymooners for the city on this presence outside the light well of the kitchen dining. we took the kids -- what did the millennial screw up watching? friends, "seinfeld" and sex in the city. i grew up in the suburbs and they grew up in the suburbs, bu
safe? not just school environments, but in our community where we will not have these fears? where we will not be afraid of mass shootings and these assault weapons, which are so rampant in this country today. >> sean burke, which like to respond to the ad that says are the president is more important than yours, then why is skeptical about putting on a secured in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards? do you think this is a pro. ? >> good morning. i also do not like anything that is done out of fear. i do not think fear is going to be good for school safety and i don't think it is good for the and states. i don't think it will produce anything that will be positive in the way of changes in school safety. i don't think it is inappropriate at to be running in the u.s., no. >> can you elaborate your responses to the newtown shooting and what you think ought to be done to increase safety in schools, sean burke? >> first of all, we promote reasonableness. i don't think there is call to go off on wild tangents or go out of the norm with a lot of ideas that are coming that
a complex environment. you don't speak the language and you have cultural deficits. it is almost impossible to develop the contextual understanding that you need. you have to understand if you're trying to impact a society. >> in other news, the militants said they have executed a french hostage captured in 2009. french armed forces tried to rescue him last saturday but failed. they executed him on wednesday evening and they say he was probably killed during the rescue attempt. the country now has a steady government. the united states recognizes them for the first time in 20 years pillar in -- 20 years. lance armstrong has been stripped of his mettle. the committee acted after the governing body found him guilty of systematic doping and stripped them of seven wins. there is speculation as to whether he will lead men to open or apologize. extremists are gaining ground militarily and they're also winning popular support. it has become increasingly powerful. the free syrian army is living in kidnapping. they met one of the leaders of the front and found this exclusive report. >> they are wait
is to foster an environment where sexual assault is not tolerated, condoned or ignored. we must have a climate of dignity and respect with where where a victim's report is taken seriously x they're provided resources. commanders or and leaders across the armed forces play an essential role in establishing this climate where victims supported, and they do not fear retaliation, where offenders know they will be found and held accountable and where bystanders are motivated to intervene. our troops take care of each other on the battlefield, the same ethos of care must extend to combating sexual assault. commanders are responsible for the good order and discipline of the forces under them. this is essential to military readiness and mission success. removing commanders from the administration of military justice would undercut their ability to establish good order and discipline in their units and undercut their authority especially in combat where the uniform code of military justice is most tested by the stresses of war. the department has undertaken a variety of initiatives to strengthen our ef
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
as part of their living environment, but see progress going forward. this is the promise of hope sf. this is personally what i recognize, what gavin started with his -- with the board of supervisors and make a big promise. but i get the lucky opportunity to see it through. i get to see the smiles of the people that are moving in and see their hopes continued. and again, it's the first of three phases for this project, but we have plans for alice griffith, for sunnydale, for potrero hill, for west side courts, every one of these will be touched. (applause) >> not just with their own money. we're going to see to it that our private partners, too, whether it's benny house or the sf foundation, the san francisco foundation that we are working very closely with already. they're helping me raise many of the private funds that go into the training services in support of services. and, of course, even our own staff at the mayor's office of housing at the cii. we're all buoyed by this. we all know at the end of it it's such a goal for everybody to have decent living lives and environment. th
economic environment. it's not just about the u.s. any more. it's a very global marketplace we need to remain competitive. the rankings show we are slipping behind a little bit. we are still topping the world still a top ten but it's a struggling environment for us right now. >> barely top 10. sandra smith, fox business networks. 25 after the hour. still to come obama care was supposed to cut costs for healthcare to all. now we are finding another hidden fee that insurance companies will be charging you to pay for someone else. plus a teacher is told to remove a ronald reagan quote from her classroom because it could be offensive to her students. we will explain. first on this day in history in 1954 joe dimaggio marries marilyn monroe. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >> he could no
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
and participate in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bri
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing
a sale but i'm hearing it may be a redevelopment of the area with a different built environment. is that what -- >> director rahaim: yeah. i believe as a state agency, they're not allowed to -- state university, they can't sell outright because that would be lease but the idea is it would be redeveloped and ucsf would move out. >> commissioner antonini: but there could be a difficult built environment but you're not sure what they have in mind. >> director rahaim: the assumption there would be a whole new different buildings there, new development, yes angetd thank you. >> president fong: commissioner sugaya. >> commissioner sugaya: just on sue hestor's point about an org chart there is one but it doesn't have staff so you can put people on here. >> director rahaim: we have a work chart that shows the staff names and we've happy to put that on the website. >> commissioner sugaya: that would help because i've wondered where people are and stuff like that. then in terms of -- thank you for answering my question right off the bat that's clear. so i think the numbers will change as
to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening
. but i would like to be able to have an expressive environment for our community, where they can learn about where they are, they can be excited about the history and the currency. so that's -- i've said enough there, i guess. and, also, we will have words in the stone that say here, and hear. so there will be two different hears there. again, as an artist i'm very interested to have people understand where they are, and why they're there. so that's that section. and then we've had a really wonderful time with the tower. and the tower is -- and i'm working with glenn rescolvo and -- architects and asked if i could also work on this aspect of the building. and they said they would allow me to do that. and i based it on the concept of a building being a basket. and i particularly like japanese baskets, and the ar artistry of. so i took that idea and i developed a wall pattern, using form liners. and so this is the wall pattern here. it's a fairly complex pattern, with very tight restrictions. ige$jqm have three inches to wk within. so i found an incredible artist also, a manufacturer of
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
that environment anymore. maybe that is good for the sunshine law but with intense media scrutiny and day-to-day negotiations it is tougher to get the deal done. i would like for them to go to camp david for one week. lori: with a chance to get spending cuts? will republicans have any leverage? >> there is opportunity to have responsible conversation. lori: that anything done? >> it is possible. the budget that was criticized the president has proposed drastic spending cuts and froze discretionary spending over five years n what democrats would be happy about what would follow if there was a deal. it is maybe a little less likely than one year ago but it is possible. lori: meno bernanke will leave at the end of the term. how will that unfolds? >> now -- now they say tim geithner will go to the head of the federal reserve. [laughter] i think he has had his do but it is a close relationship. it is with the entire board and not just the chairman. on lot of people have known them for a long time. lori: who will handicap the next fed chief? >> double not speculate. >> you were working with a t
probably by investors, then suppliers, larger communities and the environment. they're all important. they all need to be taken into consideration. but i think the real secret sauce to a successful conscious business is prioritizing customers and employees. >> tom: one thing you have to deal with when talking about prioritizing customers is retail prices. food prices specifically. youeal with thesevery d directly. food inflation is moderated certainly from the big year-over-year increases we saw in 2011. it's been volatile, though. so how do you deal with that for your stakeholders, for your customers? >> there's not-- honestly, there's not that much you can do about it because if your raw cost goes up, you sort of have to pass those on. and i mean, i always think people misunderstand inflation because it's really just the currency depreciating and working its way out through all the different sections. if the federal government increases the money supply faster than productivity you're going to see inflation. and that's what we're seeing in food right now because the fed's been incr
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, children as human shields in the gun debate. then, who's leading the way for women in the workforce. behind the headlines: as we introduce you to some new female members of congress, this week it's arizona's kyrsten sinema. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the gun debate rages on. children move to the forefront of the gun control debate as both sides use kids in their campaigns. first, the nra released a web ad accusing president obama of being a hypocrite. >> just another elitist hypocrite. >> that because he's skeptical of putting armed guards in schools while his daughters are protected by the secret service. then, flanked by children of all ages in the background, mr. obama signed 23 executive orders on g
benefits, but it's also extremely detrimental to the environment, so i think we should continue to wean our self off of that source and look into more environmentally friendly sources. >> there's no easy answer. drilling for oil can result in environmental disasters like the one recently in the gulf of mexico. and burning coal can add pollution to our air. while no one can guarantee that nuclear power plants can be completely safe, most experts agree plants can be designed to be safer than they are today. >> we see them all the time, but very few of us look closely, so here's this week's "flag facts." >> it's home to the oldest european settlement in north america -- st. augustine. it's where our rockets boldly launch into the final frontier. and if you prefer to boldly go a bit closer to earth, it's the nation's top destination for amusement parks. >> florida. >> florida. >> florida. >> like many state flags, florida features the state seal in the center. it used to be over a white background, but around 1900, the governor asked for the red cross to be added. he thought the mostly white fl
to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (appl
then suppliers, larger communities and the environment. they're all important. they all need to be taken into consideration. but i think the real secret sauce to a successful conscious business is prioritizing customers and employees. >> tom: one thing you have to deal with when talking about prioritizing customers is retail prices. food prices specifically. you deal with these every day directly. food inflation is moderated certainly from the big year-over-year increases we saw in 2011. it's been volatile though. so how do you deal with that for your stakeholders, for your customers? >> there's not-- honestly, there's not that much you can do about it because if your raw cost goes up, you sort of have to pass those on. and i mean i always think people misunderstand inflation because it's really just the currency depreciating and working its way out through all the different sections. if the federal government increases the money supply faster than productivity you're going to see inflation. and that's what we're seeing in food right now because the fed's been increasing the money supply
with homeless populations to doing things to help people get fit, to helping with the environment. really, anything that they want, they can find a way to turn into service. and our job is to help them make that possible. >> if this "strikes" you as a great way to do community service and you have some time to "spare," check out generation on. there's a link on our website. for "teen kids news," i'm emily l. >> there's still lots ahead, so stay with us. >> we'll be right back. >> we've reported on concussions before. with the popularity of high-impact sports, head injuries sideline teens all too often. but as scott reports, there's now a new way to help them get back in the game safely. >> i went sliding out to basically make a play and ended up, the next thing i knew is the ball was kind of behind me. i didn't know what happened, and my head hurt a lot. >> anthony had been kicked in the head. the high school sophomore had the classic signs of a concussion. >> i had a headache. i was nauseous for a little bit. really slow, it kind of took me a while to get used to kind of moving again. >>
about those impediments of them starts the business in the economic environment, tax policy, regulatory policy, the failing monetary policy, but talk in simple facts and terms they can understand. we'll feature those young men and women out there in military, that are making sure we can this have great nation, we'll call them the next generation guardians, that is how we'll reach out and touch people, and get them to understand they have to pay attend shown to the policies out of washington, d.c. neil: quick thoughts on very hot button issues, one is that republican should hold tight on this debt ceiling. and risk shutting government down if president does not give on to spending, yes or no? >> i have to say yes on that, because if we don't start to self-discipline. if we do not start to prioritize, spending, look, neil, letter from the director was sense on house, saying that obama administration will miss the deadline for sending a budget over that deadline february 4 is the same day we will launching next generation today show. we will not miss it. neil: what time are you on? >> we'
for the environment. lowers your risk of pesticides in the ground water, pesticides in our own bodies, so i think that's a good thing. >> john, it's great to have you on the program. >> it's great to be here, maria. >> thank you so much, john mackey joining us. >>> next up, we're "on the money." why women and gambling may make a better combination in business than you realize. the power of poker to boot the >>> i am a poker player. and there is really nothing greater than walking into a poker room in las vegas full of men. reminds me of my first job at merrill lynch. i think women do a few things better than men. they have better tuition and have a better poker face. women can do better in money in something that is traditionally a man's world. >> it started with clients and perspective clients. it started as a fun networking group. >> wow. >> see who the very passive ones are. you learn a lot about other people went you're playing this game. >> there are ceos here. there are women who sold companies for $100 million. there are women who go through very public divorces who need skills. >> you need to
and lawsuits. they had a challenging environment because citi is in the process of restructuring and cutting jobs. the broader market is rallying and the dow is up on good economic news and numbers jumped in december. brooke? >> let me ask you one other thing. you were tweeting about the atms and how they were customer-friendly. we are thinking hallelujah, it's about time. >> i was excited because banks like chase and pnc will give you $5 and $1 bills and coins at some point in addition larger bills like $50 and $100 bills. chase made a big push for this and rolled out 400 atms and that number can double. they are doing this as well. a couple reasons why. the more the atm can do, the less they mead a human bank teller to do for you. they help those with low bank balances. they can't afford to withdraw $60 when all they need is $47. >> i thought you were going tell me we never had to pay fees ever ever again. >> i don't think that will ever happen. >> thank you. >> from sympathy to suspicion. this notre dame football player would have been or could have been the heisman trophy winner and now
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
and less risky environments. and how to reward those local governments and governments that actually take large responsibilities for mitigating risk, with their business and investment. >> thank you. we have time for just one more question, although i've got probably three hours of questions in front of me. this next one combines three, four cards, questions from the audience, and comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. and this is about -- one part was what happened to poor people who can't afford to own land? and craig, you dealt with this, and margareta also. also, some of these vulnerable areas are also economics where factories and infrastructure, corporations are in these areas. and that's part of what drives people to be there. so there's also and industrial and economic aspect to this. in part of the challenge about helping or not helping is an ethical question, as well as a legal question. so i would like each of you to just address that briefly if you could. >> here's how i would frame it. i've been into me places where i call them the proverbial one c
is summarize the threats we face in the broader strategic environment in which our counter-terrorism efforts take place. the death of osama bin laden marked a milestone in our efforts to defeat al qaeda. al qaeda's ranks have been decimated. more key leaders have been eliminated in rapid succession at any time since 9/11. virtually every major a al qaeda affiliate has lost its key leader or operational commander. more than half of their top leadership has been eliminated. al qaeda is on the ropes and continues to get pummeled. however, his death and the capture of many other al qaeda leaders and operatives do not mark the end of al qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core l
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
for the environment; i am proud of the fact that we are on the cutting edge but together we should do better. we have a hard-working ethics commission and san franciscans have repeatedly worked for ethics reform; we need to make sure that the laws are enforced and the public is no question our transparency. now, in any legislature is easy to think of ourselves as rivals, as part of one faction or another. today was different about this board of supervisors is that there are more of us who do not think that the rigid labels of yesterday help. no one outside the city sees the differences between us, and there are endless opportunities for each of us to lead. a few months ago our beloved san francisco giants won the world series again. (applause) and they did it because every single member of the team showed up every day, played to the strengths, work together as a team, and took turns making the big plays. whether it supervisor mar, or supervisor farrell addressing looming costs, supervisor breed getting the jobs that young adults need, supervisor kim making sure all kids graduate, supervi
. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we improve the economy that we put ourselves in a better position to deal with these issues in the future so that people who depend on the safety net don't lose it. what i saw is, there were a lot of people suffering out there, and lo
art program continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures
and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88 . >> golden gate parks largest body of water ska great labor for scrolling and picnicking and both miking which can both be rented at the boat house and the lakewood design for leisure boatings and carriages and a treasure trove passing hunting ton water falls two bridges connect the strawberry island and inclient to the hills the highest upon the in golden gate park and more than free hundred feet and you can catch glimpses will from the city at the top of a romantic look out and for >> hey, guys, known a with the weekly. much to do and much to see. here the top activities at the top of my list. this tuesday, january 15th, the sf main library will feature free film night and reception and celebrate 2013.
and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. today educators can answer the question, why teach chinese to them? by simply responding, why not. i share this very prestigious bell award proudly with my students and my staff. because they are the ones helping me make my dream come true every single day. above all, i remain grateful for the opportunity to do the work that i
that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with people that can only speak chinese. and it will definitely help me in the later years. i am so happy that alice fong yu has the national blue ribbon award. it definitely deserves it. [applause] [speaking chinese] [applause] >> good evening, i am may, i was born in raised here in san francisco, and i live in bay-view hunter's point. i am an eighth grader attending ali alice fong yu, we are given a great experience to learn chinese. in my grade we have seven subjects, math, social studies and candnies -- cantonese and mandarin. th
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
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